Daniel K. Brown http://www.danielkbrown.com Installations and Exhibitions Sun, 18 Jul 2021 01:57:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.21 2021 Te Moana – Queenstown – LUMA Southern Light Project http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5273 Sun, 18 Jul 2021 01:51:02 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5273 TE MOANA      |     2021

Festival: 2021 LUMA Southern Light Project
Date: Queen’s Birthday Weekend, 4 – 7 June 2021
Media: Digital Animation | 04:17:00, 30.00fps, 1920×1080 + Digital Soundscape
Site: Queenstown Gardens, Queenstown, New Zealand
Visionscape: ©2021 Te Moana by Daniel K. Brown
Soundscape: ©2021 Te Moana by Mark K. Johnson

Te Moana, ‘the ocean’ in te reo Māori, recognises New Zealand’s unique identity as an island nation. Te Moana was specially created to be projected onto the ceiling of the Band Rotunda of the Queenstown Gardens for the 2021 LUMA Southern Light Project. It showcases magical worlds beneath the sea, filled with colourful whirlpools, fish, and taniwhas.

As a way to give back to the Queenstown community, the starting point for Te Moana was about finding a way to enable Queenstown’s youngest children to participate in the magical realm of LUMA, not just as visitors but as contributing artists. And who better to provide the vision for this underwater world than the drawings of pre-school children from Queenstown’s Early Childhood Education Centre and 6-12 year olds from Queenstown Primary, Shotover Primary and Remarkables Primary. The world of Te Moana continually changes, bringing the children’s drawings to life in one magical underwater realm after another. Imagine the thrill of a pre-schooler seeing their own drawings brought to life and in dazzling arrays of animated colour!

The music for Te Moana was composed by Mark Johnson, while the ever-transforming, magical realm of the sea was created by Daniel Brown with assistance from William du Toit and May Myo Min. Rebecca Hembrow and Muireann Carr were instrumental in coordinating and drawing out the best in our young Queenstown artists. The vision for Te Moana was proudly handed over to the sense of wonder and magic held by the youngest members of our Queenstown community: Aneika, Anja, Bailey, Bella, Clara, Diego, Elaina, Emerson, Evie, Isabel, Leo, Petra, Phoenix, and Natalie were 10-12 years old. Amy, Ariana, Charlie, Charlotte, Ellie, Frankie, Gaeun, Gus, Isla, Jackson, Liv, Ronan, Rosie, and Sophie were 8-9 years old. Devon, Duncan, Elli, Sophia, Sylvie and Tara were 6-7 years old. Ana-Luiza, Asia, Benecio, Benjamin, Fateh, Hayule, Isabella, Leila, Lua, Maisie-Jean, Matilda, Milly, Roy, Ryder F. and Ryder M. were 4 years old. Jojo and Shia were 3 years old. And Isla L. was just 2 years old.

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2020 Rome | Four Arias at the Edge of Darkness http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5215 Fri, 21 Aug 2020 01:40:55 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5215
FOUR ARIAS AT THE EDGE OF DARKNESS | 2020
Festival: “Return of the She-Wolves” Festival
Location: East bank of the Tiber River between the Ponte Sisto and Ponte Mazzini bridges, Rome, Italy
Date: 11-14 September 2020
Media: Digital animations, sound transmissions
Artist: Daniel K. Brown, in collaboration with Erika Kruger
Music: Walter Branchi (voce maschile: Roberto Laneri)

Rome’s festival event “Return of the She-Wolves” ran from sunset to midnight over four nights along the banks of the Tiber River between the Ponte Sisto and the Ponte Mazzini bridges. It showcases the work of 9 international artists and 6 international composers.In “Four Arias at the Edge of Darkness” digital animations are projected onto the 13m high stone embankment walls of the Tiber River, portraying the Roman She-Wolf witnessing the four elements of nature to the sounds of four sound arias by Walter Branchi. The animations integrate the elements of nature: Earth (stone walls), Water (ripples), Fire (sunrise), Air (moon), with the fifth element, the Spirit of the Wolf. The animations are synchronized with the sound arias of the composition. Huge, wild and luminous eyes stare at the site, attentively observing Branchi’s music that takes shape from the air. Burning suns, they dance and burn, slowly fading away.

Air | Aria fluente come è. 08:58
Fire | Aria tessi e ritessi. 05:24
Water | Aria selene coeli-rosa. 05:37
Earth | Aria al sole. 03:16Animation assistants: David Angus, Justin Beckermann, Adzrina Ibrahim, Erika Kruger, Johann Nortje, James Shaw, Hugh Smith

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2020 Light Boxes Wellington http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5052 Tue, 08 Oct 2019 03:14:45 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5052 LIGHT BOXES     |     2020

TAHU-NUI-A-RANGI | Aurora Australis (right)
TE TAHA O TE RANGI | The Edge of Heaven (left)

Exhibition:  Light Boxes Wellington
Date: 27 January – 7 August 2020
Media: Digital Images, 1095mm x 2698mm each
Site: Cobblestone Park, Vivian Street and Dunlop Terrace, Wellington, New Zealand
Visionscape ©2018 Daniel K Brown

These two panels by Professor Daniel K Brown, installed by the Wellington City Council on Vivien Street, disrupt expectations of nature and time by representing them through the eyes of oral history and indigenous storytelling. In Māori mythology, there are twelve heavens, each with its own series of heavenly bodies; Tahu-nui-a-rangi (represented in the right panel) is the uppermost of the twelve heavens and the most sacred of them all. The left panel, Taha-o-te-rangi, represents a Maori tale which proclaims: “Ko Kahukura rāua ko Tūāwhiorangi, he atua ēnā, tō rāua matua ko te imurangi e mau mai nā i te taha o te rangi”. It translates asKahukura and Tūāwhiorangi, those are atua and their father is the fragmentary rainbow that is held on the edge of the heavens”. These are design solutions being researched and imagined today by academics and artists at Victoria University Faculty of Architecture and Design. These visions of MachineTime and NatureTime are shared with Wellington’s residents and visitors as new approaches to the perception of our world around us.

Acknowledgements: Tahu-Nui-A-Rangi was created in Adobe After Effects (Trapcode Particular), and it was donated for  viewing in the Wellington Light Boxes, Cobblestone Park. The intention was to bring even more magic and light to the wonderful, illuminated community of Wellington and its many visitors. It owes everything to the incredible online tutorials and designs provided by Voxyde, SonduckFilm and others, who offer their inspirational designs to be used as teaching tools for others to learn from and build upon. Support these fine digital artists by following their internet tutorial sites!

* Source: https://maoridictionary.co.nz/search?idiom=&phrase=&proverb=&loan=&histLoanWords=&keywords=edge

 

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2019 Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi – Hutt City, New Zealand http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5156 Tue, 08 Oct 2019 02:53:15 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5156 TE TOI-O-NGĀ-RANGI – HIGHLIGHT CARNIVAL OF LIGHTS     |     2019

Exhibition: HighLight Carnival of Lights
Date: 25-28 October 2019
Digital Animation | 0:07:12:19, 25.00 fps, 1920 x 1080
Site: Lower Hutt Events Centre, Hutt City, New Zealand
Visionscape ©Daniel K Brown
Original Soundscape ©Mark K. Johnson

Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi is an immersive sound and light experience using digital animation selected by the Festival to be projected inside the new Lower Hutt Event Center, next to the Lower Hutt Townhall. In Māori mythology, there are twelve heavens, each with its own series of heavenly bodies; Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi (also known as Tikitiki-o-nga-rangi or Rangi-tikitiki) is the uppermost of the twelve heavens and the most sacred of them all. In this animated sound and light installation visitors are transported through the realms of the twelve heavens, lost in their search for Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi.

Acknowledgements: Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi was created in Adobe After Effects (Trapcode Particular), and it was donated for  viewing over the single evening of the Wheriko – Brilliant! After Dark event. The intention was to bring even more magic and light to the wonderful, illuminated community of Christchurch and its many visitors. It owes everything to the incredible online tutorials and designs provided by Voxyde, SonduckFilm and others, who offer their inspirational designs to be used as teaching tools for others to learn from and build upon. Support these fine digital artists by following their internet tutorial sites!

* Sources: http://www.sacred-texts.com/pac/lww/lww3.html and http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-CowYest-t1-body-d1-d4-d3.html

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2019 Te Toi o ngā rangi – Christchurch Art Gallery http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5026 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 02:06:11 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5026 TE TOI-O-NGĀ-RANGI – CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY     |     2019

Exhibition: Wheriko – Brilliant! | After Dark Event
Date: 24 May 2019, 7:30pm – 11:30pm
Digital Animation | 0:07:12:19, 25.00 fps, 1920 x 1080
Site: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch, New Zealand
Visionscape ©Daniel K Brown
Original Soundscape ©Mark K. Johnson

In Māori mythology, there are twelve heavens, each with its own series of heavenly bodies. Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi (also known as Tikitiki-o-nga-rangi or Rangi-tikitiki) is the uppermost of the twelve heavens and the most sacred of them all.*

As an immersive sound and light experience closely related to the theme of Christchurch Art Gallery’s exhibition Wheriko – Brilliant!, Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi was selected by Christchurch Art Gallery to activate its auditorium space for the evening of the ‘After Dark’ event held on Friday 24 May 2019. Christchurch Art Gallery Curator Felicity Milburn developed the exhibition Wheriko – Brilliant!, which considers how artists use light as a material or subject in their works. The exhibition and event’s timing coincide with Matariki, the Māori new year; the word ‘Wheriko’ means to sparkle or dazzle and several of the works refer to the stars and sky, or prismatic light effects. Wheriko – Brilliant! was presented at the Gallery from 17 May 2019 – 16 Feb 2020. To accompany the Wheriko – Brilliant! exhibition, Visitor Programmes Coordinator Amy Marr organised the ‘After Dark’ special event on the evening of Friday 24 May, which included Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi, performances, tours and the opportunity to view the exhibition throughout the evening.

Acknowledgements: Te Toi-o-ngā-rangi was created in Adobe After Effects (Trapcode Particular), and it was donated for  viewing over the single evening of the Wheriko – Brilliant! After Dark event. The intention was to bring even more magic and light to the wonderful, illuminated community of Christchurch and its many visitors. It owes everything to the incredible online tutorials and designs provided by Voxyde, SonduckFilm and others, who offer their inspirational designs to be used as teaching tools for others to learn from and build upon. Support these fine digital artists by following their internet tutorial sites!

* Sources: http://www.sacred-texts.com/pac/lww/lww3.html and http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-CowYest-t1-body-d1-d4-d3.html

 

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2019 Pūrerehua – Queenstown – LUMA Southern Light Project http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5000 Sat, 02 Feb 2019 18:59:01 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5000 PŪREREHUA      |     2019

Festival: 2019 LUMA Southern Light Project
Date: Queen’s Birthday Weekend, 31 May – 3 June 2019
Media: Digital Animation | 01:48:00, 25.00fps, 1920×1080; Digital Soundscape with Taonga Pūoro (Pūrerehua + Pahū)
Site: Queenstown Gardens, Queenstown, New Zealand
Visionscape: ©2019 Pūrerehua by Daniel K. Brown
Soundscape: ©2019 Tāwhirimātea by Mark K. Johnson

Pūrerehua is the New Zealand te reo Māori word for ‘butterfly’ or ‘moth’. It is also the word for a traditional Māori musical instrument, a ‘bullroarer’, made of wood, stone or bone attached to a long string. In this light and sound installation, 3 butterflies (in the primary colours of blue, red and yellow) come together to produce over 150 butterflies (pūrerehua) in multiple, variegated colours and patterns, born to the sounds of this ancient Māori musical instrument (pūrerehua). They eventually explode into a celebration of colour, light, sound and magical wonder.

“The kaitiaki (guardian) of the pūrerehua is Tāwhirimātea, God of the Winds. The pūrerehua takes its name from the moth. Its sound is similar to the whirling and hovering sound of a moth’s wings as it flies and flits. The beauty of the sound that emanates from the pūrerehua is in its ability to stir the soul and whirl in the deepest places of the heart, giving rise to emotion and awe.” Source: http://www.tahaa.co.nz/taonga-puoro-mainmenu-30/purerehua-mainmenu-46.html

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2018 Aurora – Queenstown – LUMA Southern Light Project http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4983 Fri, 31 Aug 2018 19:43:26 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4983 AURORA     |     2018

Festival: LUMA Southern Light Project, Queens Birthday Weekend, 1-4 June 2018
Digital Animation | 0:07:10:00, 25.00 fps, 1920 x 1080
Media: Animated projection, black fabric screen, black plastic sheeting, water, sound
Site: Queenstown Gardens, Queenstown, New Zealand
Original Soundscape ©2018 Mark K. Johnson

Aurora was specially conceived for the 2018 LUMA Southern Light Project. Its three verses depict the birth of stars, the creation of the universe, and ultimately the genesis of the Southern Lights – from which the LUMA Southern Light Project takes its name.

Acknowledgements: This project was created in Adobe After Effects (Trapcode Particular), and it was donated for outdoor viewing over the four nights of the Queens Birthday Weekend to the LUMA Southern Light Project. The intention was to help bring even more magic and light to the wonderful, illuminated community of Queenstown and its many visitors. It owes everything to the incredible online tutorials and designs provided by Voxyde, SonduckFilm and others, who offer their inspirational designs to be used as teaching tools for others to learn from and build upon. Support them by following their sites!

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2018 Inaugural Professorial Lecture http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4967 Sat, 28 Jul 2018 00:37:46 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4967 INAUGURAL PROFESSORIAL LECTURE     |     2018

Organisers: Victoria University of Wellington Engagement and Alumni Office
Date: Tuesday 24 July 2018, 6:00pm
Media: Animated projection
Site: Victoria University of Wellington, Rutherford House RHLT1, Bunny Street, New Zealand

This is Professor Daniel Brown’s inaugural lecture as Professor of Design Studio at Victoria University of Wellington. This public lecture series provides the opportunity to engage with the latest thinking on the world’s major issues. In this public lecture, Professor Daniel Brown tells ten tales about how a work of Architecture finds its Voice. These tales draw from painting, sculpture, film, music, poetry, philosophy, religion, politics, linguistics, cultural studies, Māori and Pasifika studies, and the classics. One story describes how the Māori karanga becomes embedded into an architectural design. Another story describes how – through architecture – a Pasifika student is reintroduced to her cultural heritage by the tales of her maternal grandmother. Daniel reflects upon how the Humanities and Social Sciences provide a fundamental voice to all New Zealand industries and professions, especially architecture. Professor Brown graduated from Yale University and is a recipient of the New Zealand National Award for Sustained Excellence in Tertiary Teaching as well as the Fulbright Fellowship.

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2018 Rivers of the Underworld – Wellington (proposal) http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4923 Wed, 01 Mar 2017 01:35:21 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4923 RIVERS OF THE UNDERWORLD     |     2018

Daniel K. Brown
Proposal for the Adam Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand

Digital Animation | 0:01:10:00, 25.00 fps, 720 x 1650
Media: Sound, animated projection, water
Music: © 2017 Mark K. Johnson 

In this proposal for the Adam Art Gallery in Wellington, the five Rivers of the Underworld appear – one in each gallery. The five rivers are Acheron the River of Sorrow, Phlegethon the River of Boiling Blood, Cocytus the River of Frozen Tears, Styx the River of Hatred, and Lethe the River of Forgetfulness. Five framed images lead from the entry to the first gallery showing concept design images for the five river installations.

Lethe is sited on the entry floor gallery. Letters of the alphabet cascade like a waterfall, filling the blackened river with reflections of a myriad of disjointed letters. As the falling letters gain in intensity and momentum, they spell out lines from works of literature that refer to the river Lethe – before disappearing into the turbulence. As the letters tumble into the pool, they become reflected back up onto the lower segment of the screen to create a cacophony of illumination. The work begins and ends with a line from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: “… in Lethe steep; If it be thus to dream, still let me sleep!” (IV.ii.61).

The soundscape by Mark K. Johnson is derived from the structural characteristics of the quoted texts. The number of syllables in a word, the location of stressed syllables, the length of phrases, and the word order determine the musical notes and their durations. The upward and downward direction of the melody alternates between adjacent words, while the voices represent the lines of the poems. In this way, the texts are transformed into the soundscape itself, as well as the visionscape.

Thumb

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2018 Edge of the Universe – Wellington – Lux Light Festival http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4840 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4840#comments Mon, 06 Feb 2017 03:26:45 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4840 EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE     |     2018

Festival: LUX Light Festival, 18-27 May 2018

Digital Animation | 0:07:00:00, 25.00 fps, 1650 x 720
Media: Sound, animated projection, black screen
Site: Taranaki Wharf diving platform cut-out, Wellington
Music: “Edge” ©2017 Mark K. Johnson

In this installation for the Lux Light Festival 2018, letters of the alphabet cascade like a waterfall from the cornice of a small building on Taranaki Wharf into the Wellington Harbour below. As the falling letters gain in intensity and momentum, they spell out lines from six poems along the Wellington Writers’ Walk, before disappearing into the turbulence again. As the letters tumble into the harbour, they become reflected back up onto the lower segment of the screen to create a cacophony of illumination. The work begins and ends with the New Zealand poet laureate Bill Manhire’s poem on the Writers’ Walk: “I live at the edge of the universe like everybody else”. The first letter to fall is a capital N; as it slowly rotates it becomes Z, then N and Z once more, before fading away at the bottom.

VUW Postgraduate Student Collaborators: Nicholas Kempster and Branislav Tosic

I live at the edge of the universe like everybody else

Edge of the Universe_imageEdge

These excerpts from 6 poems along the Wellington Writers’ Walk invite a larger story to unfold when placed together – a story about taking risks, learning from mistakes, making a difference, seeing the light within the darkness, and gaining wisdom over time.

I live at the edge
of the universe,
like everybody else.
(Bill Manhire: ‘Milky Way Bar’ in Milky Way Bar, Victoria University Press, 1991)

… there’s always an edge
here that one must walk which is sharp
and precarious, requiring vigilance.
(Patricia Grace: Cousins, Penguin Books, 1992)

It’s true you can’t live here by chance,
you have to do and be, not simply watch …
(Lauris Edmond: ‘The Active Voice’ in Scenes from a Small City, Daphne Brasell Associates Press, 1994)

Blue rain from a clear sky.
Our world a cube of sunlight –
but to the south
the violet admonition of thunder.
(Alistair Te Ariki Campbell: ‘Blue Rain’ in The Dark Lord of Savaiki: Collected Poems, Hazard Press, 2003)

Then with the coming of darkness the
bay opened up beneath us, like a shell splashed
with beads of light.
(Marilyn Duckworth: A Barbarous Tongue, Hutchinson, 1963)

And now, as I grow in years,
I feel at times like an old
violin played on by a master
hand. …
(Patrick Lawlor: Old Wellington Days, Whitcombe & Tombs, 1959)

I live at the edge
of the universe,
like everybody else.
(Bill Manhire: ‘Milky Way Bar’ in Milky Way Bar, Victoria University Press, 1991)

 

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2017 Edge of the Universe – Queenstown – Southern Light Project http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4880 Sun, 05 Feb 2017 23:06:29 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4880 EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE     |     2017

Festival: LUMA Southern Light Project, Queens Birthday Weekend, 2-5 June 2017
Digital Animation | 0:07:20:00, 25.00 fps, 1650 x 720
Media: Animated projection, black fabric screen, black plastic sheeting, water, sound
Site: Queenstown Park, Queenstown, New Zealand
Music: “Edge” ©2017 Mark K. Johnson

In EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE, projected letters of the alphabet cascade like a waterfall on a black screen held between two trees in the woods at the southern end of Queenstown Park. As the falling letters gain in intensity and momentum, they spell out selected lines from six poems by New Zealand writers, before disappearing into a shallow pool of water below. As the letters hit the water, they create a reflected cacophony of illumination. The work begins and ends with: “I live at the edge of the universe like everybody else”, from a poem by New Zealand poet laureate Bill Manhire. The first letter to fall is a capital N. As it slowly rotates it becomes Z, then N and Z once more, before fading away at the bottom. There were 35,000 visitors. To view the original animation and soundscape, see: https://vimeo.com/219185985

Screen Shot 2017-02-15 at 2.00.29 pmThe excerpts below taken from six New Zealand poems invite a larger story to unfold when placed together – a story about taking risks, learning from mistakes, making a difference, seeing the light within the darkness, and gaining wisdom over time.

I live at the edge
of the universe,
like everybody else.
(Bill Manhire: ‘Milky Way Bar’ in Milky Way Bar, Victoria University Press, 1991)

… there’s always an edge
here that one must walk which is sharp
and precarious, requiring vigilance.
(Patricia Grace: Cousins, Penguin Books, 1992)

It’s true you can’t live here by chance,
you have to do and be, not simply watch …
(Lauris Edmond: ‘The Active Voice’ in Scenes from a Small City, Daphne Brasell Associates Press, 1994)

Blue rain from a clear sky.
Our world a cube of sunlight –
but to the south
the violet admonition of thunder.
(Alistair Te Ariki Campbell: ‘Blue Rain’ in The Dark Lord of Savaiki: Collected Poems, Hazard Press, 2003)

Then with the coming of darkness the
bay opened up beneath us, like a shell splashed
with beads of light.
(Marilyn Duckworth: A Barbarous Tongue, Hutchinson, 1963)

And now, as I grow in years,
I feel at times like an old
violin played on by a master
hand. …
(Patrick Lawlor: Old Wellington Days, Whitcombe & Tombs, 1959)

I live at the edge
of the universe,
like everybody else.
(Bill Manhire: ‘Milky Way Bar’ in Milky Way Bar, Victoria University Press, 1991)

The soundscape by Mark K. Johnson for EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE has six movements representing the atmospheres evoked by the six poems. The music is derived from the structural characteristics of lines from these New Zealand poems. The number of syllables in a word, the location of stressed syllables, the length of phrases, and the word order determine the musical notes and their durations. The upward and downward direction of the melody alternates between adjacent words, while the voices represent the lines of the poems. In this way, the poems’ texts are transformed into the soundscape itself, as well as the visionscape.

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2017 Chinese Scholars’ Studio – Wellington http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5111 Sat, 04 Feb 2017 04:02:37 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=5111 CHINESE SCHOLARS’ STUDIO     |     2020

Opening in 2020, the Chinese Scholars’ Studio will be located in the seminar space adjacent to Wai-te-ata Press, on the lower level of Victoria University’s Rankine Brown Library. Hamish Beattie, a PhD candidate in Architecture, in collaboration with Daniel K. Brown, Professor of Studio Design at Victoria, have created a compelling design concept for the Chinese Scholars’ Studio based on an ‘exploded’ interrogation of the printing press.

The studio design concept bridges the rich history of the Chinese community in Wellington and letterpress printing with new materials and technologies. The Chinese Scholars’ Studio includes an adjacent exhibition area as well as a modest outdoor garden, seamlessly stitching Wai-te-ata Press into a new tapestry of intercultural communication. The new studio has been funded by generous donations from the Chinese Poll Tax Heritage Trust, NZ China Friendship Society, Dominion Federation of NZ Chinese Commercial Growers, the Chan family, and anonymous donors.

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2016 Pulse Luma – Queenstown – Southern Light Project http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4792 Sat, 11 Jun 2016 00:49:06 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4792 PULSE LUMA | 2016

Festival: LUMA Southern Light Project | Queen’s Birthday Weekend 3-5 June 2016
Media: Digital animation 0:05:50:00, 25.00 fps, 1280 x 720 | digital soundscape | fabric screen
Site: Queenstown, New Zealand | Freshwater pond in the Queenstown Gardens
Music for Pulse: 2 cellos, violin, harp and tympanum (composed and performed by Mark K. Johnson)

This installation for the LUMA Southern Light Festival unveils the PULSE of nature, still beating beneath our cities. The living landscape lies permanently hidden beneath the built landscape, but this landscape still has a PULSE. It continues to beat, but we have lost our connection with the pulse of our natural environment.

Visionscape (Daniel K. Brown)

PULSE represents the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time – all transforming continually in response to the environment around us. PULSE originates as a dense cluster of water reflections that appear in the darkness deep beneath the harbour wharf. A sound tone triggers the first Pulse, a concentric ring of light that emanates outward from the darkened space and then returns inward again, ever repeating, while increasing in intensity and complexity. The circles of light act as the horizontal equivalent of a depth sounding. When the circles hit the wooden pilings or choppy water or rocky outcrops, the perfect circles of light distort as well as reflect in other directions. Through the distortion of these circles, we decipher the topography of the mysterious, darkened spaces beneath the wharf, a threshold between the original landscape and the city above. And we are reminded of the interconnection of the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time.

Soundscape (Mark K. Johnson)

The soundscape for Pulse includes a principal melody generated from the number of syllables in an ancient Latin text from the Night Hours – prayers only recited in the hours of darkness. The melody is established by Cello 1. Rhythmically every time a new word begins, the time signature changes to accommodate the number of syllables. The Harp follows the identical rhythmic scheme as Cello 1 but delayed by one beat. Cello 2 cycles through one loud Pulse of six beats, then one medium beat followed by one soft beat, relentlessly throughout. The Violin enters exactly one beat after each rest in the cello melody, using only three pitches and alternating between whichever pitch is not used directly below it by one of the other instrumental voices. The Tympanum strikes every 4 beats until the end. It represents the rhythm of the heartbeat – the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time.

PULSE refers to the Pulse of Nature (environmental dynamics), the Pulse of Life (blood flowing through our veins), and the Pulse of Time (eternity). The Pulse connects all cultures around the world. It connects us to our natural environment. It is universal to us all.

PULSE LUMA © 2016 Daniel K. Brown
PULSE LUMA Soundscape © 2016 Mark K. Johnson
Digital animation: Johann Nortje and Daniel K. Brown
Original Soundtrack: https://soundcloud.com/mark-k-johnson/sets/medieval-and-other-strangeness
PULSE LUMA video: https://vimeo.com/170076714
LUMA video by Simon Ennals: https://vimeo.com/169655964

PULSE LUMA 2016

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2015 Pulse – Wellington Lux Light Festival http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3488 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3488#comments Fri, 21 Aug 2015 06:21:35 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3488 PULSE LUX     |     2015
Media:   Digital animation | 0:05:50:00, 25.00 fps, 1280 x 720
              Animated lights, digital soundscape
Music:   2 Cellos, violin, harp and tympanum
Site:      Wellington Harbour wharf cutout between Museum of Te Papa and Circa Theatre
 
Festival: Wellington Lux Light Festival | 21-30 August 2015

Our cities have arisen where once were dynamic primal landscapes; now the living landscape lies permanently hidden beneath the concrete. This urban landscape still has a PULSE. It continues to beat even beneath the hardscape of the city, but we have lost our connection with the pulse of our natural environment. This installation for the LUX Festival unveils the PULSE of nature, still beating beneath our capital city.

Visionscape (Daniel K. Brown)

PULSE represents the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time – all transforming continually in response to the environment around us. PULSE originates as a dense cluster of water reflections that appear in the darkness deep beneath the harbour wharf. A sound tone triggers the first Pulse, a concentric ring of light that emanates outward from the darkened space and then returns inward again, ever repeating, while increasing in intensity and complexity. The circles of light act as the horizontal equivalent of a depth sounding. When the circles hit the wooden pilings or choppy water or rocky outcrops, the perfect circles of light distort as well as reflect in other directions. Through the distortion of these circles, we decipher the topography of the mysterious, darkened spaces beneath the wharf, a threshold between the original landscape and the city above. And we are reminded of the interconnection of the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time.

Pulse at mid tide level

Soundscape (Mark K. Johnson)

The soundscape for Pulse includes a principal melody generated from the number of syllables in an ancient Latin text from the Night Hours – prayers only recited in the hours of darkness. The melody is established by Cello 1. Rhythmically every time a new word begins, the time signature changes to accommodate the number of syllables. The Harp follows the identical rhythmic scheme as Cello 1 but delayed by one beat. Cello 2 cycles through one loud Pulse of six beats, then one medium beat followed by one soft beat, relentlessly throughout. The Violin enters exactly one beat after each rest in the cello melody, using only three pitches and alternating between whichever pitch is not used directly below it by one of the other instrumental voices. The Tympanum strikes every 4 beats until the end. It represents the rhythm of the heartbeat – the Pulse of Nature, the Pulse of Life, the Pulse of Time.

PULSE refers to the Pulse of Nature (environmental dynamics), the Pulse of Life (blood flowing through our veins), and the Pulse of Time (eternity).  The Pulse connects all cultures around the world.  It connects us to our natural environment. It is universal to us all.

PULSE LUX © 2015 Daniel K. Brown
PULSE LUX Soundscape © 2015 Mark K. Johnson
Digital animation: Johann Nortje and Daniel K. Brown
Original Soundtrack: https://soundcloud.com/mark-k-johnson/sets/medieval-and-other-strangeness
Pulse LUX at LUX Festival 2015: https://vimeo.com/138380211
 

PULSE at high tide with wind2

]]> http://www.danielkbrown.com/?feed=rss2&p=3488 8882 2015 Invisible Cities http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4665 Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:53:28 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4665 INVISIBLE CITIES     |     2015

Festival Event: Remembering Italo Calvino: a Literary Happening | 24 Sept 2015

A celebration of Italo Calvino on the 30th anniversary of his death, sponsored by the Embassy of Italy in Wellington and Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

For this celebration, six people were invited to each deliver a ten minute personal “reflection” on Italo Calvino. Daniel K. Brown presented his short film Invisible Cities, a Wellington Architect’s Perspective.

“In Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, Marco Polo regales Kublai Khan every evening with new and ever more imaginative stories of the most extraordinary and fantastical cities in the world. One evening Kublai Khan says to Marco Polo, “After all these tales, there is still one place of which you never speak – your own city of Venice.” Marco Polo responds, “Ah, but every time I have depicted a new city, I have actually been describing Venice.”

The moral of the tale is that the cities in which we live are in fact composed of a myriad of the most extraordinary and magical places – but we only recognize them if we open up both our imaginations and our hearts to the extraordinary wonders that they hold within. So let me now tell you a tale of nine Invisible Cities of Wellington. …”

Invitation designed by Leonardo Carta:calvino 1Programme:

REMEMBERING ITALO CALVINO

A Literary Happening

Italo Calvino: un uomo invisibile |Italo Calvino: An Invisible Man

Rory McKenzie

Welcome

Francesca Benocci & Sydney Shep

Opening Speech

His Excellency Carmelo Barbarello, Ambassador of Italy

Six Fragments for an Obituary

Marco Sonzogni

A Sign in Space

Francesca Kurghan & Anastasia Roberts

Palomar’s Calvino

Marta Simonetti

An Invisible City

James Kierstead

Invisible Cities from an Architect’s perspective in Wellington

Daniel K. Brown

Acknowledgments

Eleonora Bello

Remembering Italo Calvino

2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the death of noted Italian journalist, novelist, and short story writer, Italo Calvino (Santiago de las Vegas 1923 – Siena 1985).Victoria students and staff joined in a celebration of his life and work last week at Wai-te-ata Press.

Calvino’s best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy, the Cosmicomics collection of short stories, and the novels Invisible Cities and If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler. Lionised in Britain and the United States, he was the most-translated contemporary Italian writer at the time of his death, and a noted contender for the Nobel Prize for Literature.

The event organisers, Eleonora Bello and Francesca Benocci, both PhD students in the Italian Programme in the School of Languages and Cultures, choreographed an evening across all disciplines and languages. Poetry, multimedia video, drama, film, and prose offerings by Marco Sonzogni, Marta Simonetti, James Kierstead, and Daniel Brown, together with the students Francesca Kurghan, Anastasia Roberts, and Honours student in Italian Rory McKenzie, gave life to an amazing commemoration of the legacy of Italo Calvino. The presence of the Embassy of Italy in the person of HE Ambassador Carmelo Barbarello, capped an inspired creative conversation and opportunity for cross-cultural engagement.

Web. 8 Oct. 2015. <https://www.victoria.ac.nz/staff/news/2015/09/remembering-italo-calvino>

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2013 New York – Behold http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4422 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4422#comments Tue, 26 Mar 2013 20:45:36 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=4422 BEHOLD     |     2013

“Gathering Place” Exhibition
NLE (No Longer Empty) Lab Gallery, 24 West 8th Street, New York, NY, USA
22 February – 23 March 2013
 
Original Concept and Collaboration: Kristin Jones, Andrew Ginzel
Original Artwork:  Daniel K. Brown

Media: Photomontage digital rendering, 594 x 841 mm

A historic tree in NYC becomes an illuminated installation exhibition, commissioned for NLE Lab Gallery exhibition “Gathering Place” to evidence 8th Street Greenwich Village’s unique history, and to engage the community in critical dialogue around its future.

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2012 Kathmandu – Capturing the Cosmic Sea http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3150 Mon, 07 Jan 2013 22:06:31 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3150 CAPTURING THE COSMIC SEA     |     2012
Funding Organisation: Asian Cultural Council
Site: Kathmandu, Nepal
Media:  Lithograph, one colour
Dimensions:  1220mm x 570mm
Signed, limited edition

CAPTURING THE COSMIC SEA is a limited edition lithograph representing a Vishnu shrine in the Kathmandu Valley that narrates Nepalese mythologies relating to the origins of the cosmos. The series was fully funded by a grant from the Asian Cultural Council, 6 West 48th Street, 12th Floor, New York, New York 10036.

The Vishnu temple at Budhanikantha uses architecture to capture rainwater and to depict the ‘creation myth’ of Vishnu sleeping upon the serpent-king in the cosmic sea. Another temple architecturally depicts this serpent-king Karkotak Naag residing in the last residual pool of the cosmic sea at Taudaha.  Water from this pool was said to feed the royal baths of Kathmandu; the architecture of the baths depicts the cosmic sea and water flows from architectural elements carved in the form of the serpent-king. A temple near Machhegaon combines architecture with nature to describe the Vishnu story of Machhe Narayan emerging into his fish incarnation. Visitors see two natural pools of water plus one rectangular pool in-between, as if the natural pond has been transformed into a sacred body of water. In Dhum Varahi, an architectural shrine tells the story of Vishnu rescuing the goddess Earth (symbolized by a pipal tree).  A temple containing a Vishnu statue was constructed between the exposed roots of a young pipal tree. As the tree grew over time, the roots have embraced the Vishnu shrine to the point of crushing the temple, as if in symbolic depiction of Mother Earth’s thanks for her salvation.

My professional goals have centered on how architecture can directly respond to cultural imperatives through narrative, and ultimately how studies of traditional architecture can help reestablish critical links to ritual in contemporary architecture and society.  I believe that the future of architectural design lies not in western design overwhelming the east, but rather in the west fully understanding, engaging and incorporating eastern sensitivities into contemporary design, actively celebrating unique imperatives from the east rather than running the risk they may be lost forever.

CAPTURING THE COSMIC SEA © 2012 Daniel K. Brown

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2012 Milan Cemetery – City of Silence http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=683 Sun, 19 Aug 2012 04:58:36 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=683 CITY OF SILENCE |   2012
Media: Screen Prints, black on white
Signed, limited editions of 20 each
Paper Dimensions:  560mm wide x 770mm high
Image Dimensions: 485mm wide x 620mm high
Frame Dimensions: 860mm wide x 1020mm high

CITY OF SILENCE is a series of screen prints of 45 Italian Liberty Style monuments in the Cimitero Monumentale di Milano, composed as a series of stark personified ‘portraits’ of the tombs. The series was fully funded and produced while on an arts fellowship at the Liguria Study Center for the Arts and Humanities in Bogliasco, Italy.

CITY OF SILENCE © 2012 Daniel K. Brown
Research Assistants: Adam Alexander, Marco Mornata, and Matthew Reid
With special thanks to Terry Dwan
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2011 Brooklyn – Night Hours http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3127 Sat, 25 Jun 2011 04:57:16 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3127 NIGHT HOURS     | 2011
Exhibition: “The Architecture of Devotion”
Location: Gowanus Ballroom: a Space Dedicated to Art, Architecture and Engineering, 55 9th Street, Brooklyn, NY
Dates: 24 June to 3 July 2011
Media:  Digital Animation    |    0:05:29:00, 25.00 fps, 1280 x 720, continual loop

NIGHT HOURS premiered at the Gowanus Ballroom: a Space Dedicated to Art, Architecture and Engineering in “The Architecture of Devotion” Exhibition. It explores turn-of-the-century family mausoleums in Milan’s Monumental Cemetery (Cimitero Monumentale de Milano) as architecture of devotion.

In the Catholic Church, Night Hours are fixed times of prayer in the Roman Catholic Church that take place during the hours of darkness. The work is in three short movements represented by Psalms selected from the Night Hours: Vespers (Psalms 1-8), Compline (Psalms 4, 90, and 133), and Lauds (Psalms 94, 83, and 95). The work begins at the moment of sunset and ends upon the edge of dawn. The texts of the Psalms appear as rain (tears) transforming into architecture – bringing life to the memorials, cleansing them, and then washing them from our memory once more. The music by Mark K. Johnson, titled “Into the Light”, is a devotional hymn, intended to mark the observance of the passing of a loved one from this world into the next.

NIGHT HOURS © 2011 Daniel K. Brown
Music “Into the Light” © 2010 Mark K. Johnson
Digital animation assistance: Johann Nortje

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2011 Wellington – Rondeau – sorta http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3356 Fri, 24 Jun 2011 04:57:14 +0000 http://www.danielkbrown.com/?p=3356 RONDEAU – SORTA     | 2011
Media: Gelatin Silverprint  [1:1 Scale Piano Photomontage]
Dimensions:  2400mm x 1800mm
Private Collection
For video flicker, click here.

RONDEAU – SORTA © 2011 Daniel K. Brown
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